Upgrading PostgreSQL from 9.4 to 10.3 with pglogical

I recently helped a customer upgrade their PostgreSQL instance from 9.4.x on RHEL to 10.x on Ubuntu. While it initially sounded daunting, the use of pglogical and some planning actually made it rather straightforward. While there’s nothing new or original in this post, I still felt compelled to write it up both for posterity’s sake and for anyone else that might find the info useful as an example in their own endeavors.

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Car(e) free in Columbus

Last year, at the beginning of March, I turned in my 2014 Kia Optima LX at the end of its lease and decided to go ‘car free’. I wanted to see exactly how much of a PITA it would be, how many services I’d need to subscribe to to get things done, and how much money it would actually save me. It’s now been a year, and I can definitively answer these questions.

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updated PostgreSQL homebrew script

With the release of PostgreSQL 10, I’ve updated my pg script. You might recall from previous posts that this script is for Homebrew users that have tapped Peter’s brew recipes. It allows for installing and switching between multiple version of PostgreSQL seemlessly. While I was in there adding v10 support, I tweaked and tuned the code a bit and tidyied up the output significantly. I’m pretty pleased with the new version actually.

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When you cannot get there from here

Connecting to a PostgreSQL instance isn’t hard generally, but sometimes you can run into issues. Sometimes a port isn’t open on a firewall, or the server is in a VLAN that you can’t get to, or perhaps the server isn’t running on the network interface you think it is. More commonly, you can reach the PostgreSQL instance but you’re connection isn’t authorized (which is not the same as being unable to authenticate). Fortunately, the error messages returned in these different failure scenarios are fairly verbose and distinct so you can easily tell which scenario you’re facing. Let’s dive into each scenario and see what the error looks like, shall we?

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Installing pgBackRest on OSX

If you’ve followed my previous posts (here and here), then you already have one or more versions of PostgreSQL installed on your Mac. Maybe these are solely for test or dev purposes and you don’t really care about any of the data therein, but if you do, let me guide you to pgBackRest.

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